Wednesday, 22 May 2019

Dusty Pages Review: An Unwanted Guest

I

We can't choose the strangers we meet.
As the guests arrive at beautiful, remote Mitchell's Inn, they're all looking forward to a relaxing weekend deep in the forest, miles from anywhere. They watch their fellow guests with interest, from a polite distance. 
Usually we can avoid the people who make us nervous, make us afraid.
With a violent storm raging, the group finds itself completely cut off from the outside world. Nobody can get in - or out. And then the first body is found...and the horrifying truth comes to light. There's a killer among them - and nowhere to run. 
Until we find ourselves in a situation we can't escape. Trapped.
 (Audiobook)

I've read Shari Lapena before (The Couple Next Door) and enjoyed it very much. This book is a stand alone, not attached in anyway to the previous novels by the same author and is very much a classic who done it.

Imagine you set off for a quiet weekend in a remote spot, only to get snowed in, with a collection of strangers, with no power and no way to get word to the outside world that you need help - nothing could be worse, right? Wrong. It can be worse when one of the guests is found dead at the bottom of the stairs. Is it an accident or murder?

Its a very twisting tale and the good thing about it, is although several suspects are put into the frame by their fellow guests, the who and why of the crime is very much left to the end. I do hate mysteries that either give it away right at the beginning, or have you following the killers P.O.V so that you clearly know who did it and are just waiting for everyone else to catch up. In this story even when the mystery is solved and the guilty party arrested, there is a delicious little twist that I just loved.

I give it



Monday, 20 May 2019

Meet A Writer Monday Presents...

... Isabelle Kenyon


1. Tell me about your book, Digging Holes To Another Continent, and where you got your inspiration for it?

I wrote this poetry book entirely during my time in New Zealand. It was the first time I had ever been and it was also the first time that my uncle, in his 50s, was getting married. It was a massive family occasion! However, it was also after the death of my grandma, so it was a very bizarre Shakespearean experience – with a death and then a celebration. It was about healing and coming together as dysfunctional but happy family.

2. Did you learn anything from writing this book? If so what was it?

I learnt that even in poetry, the story from start to finish and a collection is one of the most important things to me as a writer. I want the reader to know me as a person in that capsule of my existence! I also learnt that traditional publishers do want to publish me! I’m really grateful to Clare Songbirds Publishing House, New York.

3. If you could have one meal for the rest of your life what would it be?

This one is the easiest question so far! It would definitely be spaghetti and meatballs with a delicious tomato sauce.

4. Mountains or the beach?

Probably the mountains. It’s least likely to have people!

5. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go and why?

I really want to go on safari because I love animals and let’s be honest, we killing them at an increasing rate… Maybe I’ve got limited time!

6. What feels like love to you?


It feels like the safest hug in the world. It feels overwhelming in all engulfing way.

7. What motivates you to succeed as a writer?

Okay, to be real… I need the money (don’t we all!) But on a serious note, I read fantastic books and I know that I want to achieve a certain level of craft inspired by those writers.

8. Have you ever considered collaborating with another writer? If Yes who, if no why not?

I am currently collaborating with Maltese poet, Miriam Calleja, which is a really interesting experience – I have to write a poem every three days, as does she, and they have to be in response to the poem that the other person has just written.

9. Do you think the cover plays an important part in the buying process?

100%. I’m definitely much more skilled at designing book covers now (because I’m a publisher, I run Fly on the Wall Press, and I’ve had to start designing book covers to save money!), and I definitely notice much more engagement online with a professional cover.

10. What part of your writing time do you dedicate to marketing your book?

Marketing is literally my life. I feel like a lot of people don’t have the time to market the book, but for me it’s integral and I definitely do more than actual writing, it would be great if there were more hours in the day so I could do both!

11. Do you think giving away books for free works and why?

No, I really don’t actually. I’ve done multiple things like this, and not one person that given a free book to has ever left a review. This is always my hope and they have never returned the favour, even when I ask nicely haha!

12. Have you written any other books that are not published? Do you intend to publish them?

Yes, I am currently looking for a publisher for a new collection of poetry. However, it’s important that I find a publisher who aligns with my values and who believes in my work!

13. Do you have a day job in addition to being a writer? If so, what do you do during the day?

So I’m a freelance Book Marketing Consultant and Editor. I run Fly on the Wall Press and I love it. You can find out more about the press at www.flyonthewallpoetry.co.uk


______________________________________
“Digging Holes to Another Continent” by Isabelle Kenyon is masterful collection of poetry exploring the feelings of grief and the search for peace. Kenyon’s use of imagery not only teleports you to the sandy shores she writes about, but immerses you in them so much that you can feel the tide lapping at your toes. Above all else, this collection is a poetic lesson that healing isn’t always linear. - Cyrus Parker, author of DROPKICK Romance 
BUY

About Isabelle

Isabelle Kenyon is northern, UK based poet and a graduate in Theatre: Writing, Directing and Performance from the University of York.

Isabelle is the author of This is not a Spectacle, Micro chapbook, The Trees Whispered (Origami Poetry Press) and Digging Holes To Another Continent (Clare Songbirds Publishing House, New York). She is the editor of Fly on the Wall Press, a socially conscious small press for chapbooks and anthologies. Her poems have been published in poetry anthologies such as Verve Poetry Press, and The Road To Clevedon Pier (Hedgehog Poetry Press). She has had poems published in literary journals such as Wordsmith HQ, Eunoia Review, FoxTrott Uniform, Mojave Heart Review, The Blue Nib, Dear Reader, Breath and Shadow, The Pangolin Review, I Am Not A Silent Poet, Eskimo Pie, Scrittura, Anti - Heroin Chic and more.



Facebook | Twitter | Instagram


Wednesday, 15 May 2019

Dusty Pages Review: The Cuckoo's Calling



When a troubled model falls to her death from a snow-covered Mayfair balcony, it is assumed that she has committed suicide. However, her brother has his doubts, and calls in private investigator Cormoran Strike to look into the case.

Strike is a war veteran - wounded both physically and psychologically - and his life is in disarray. The case gives him a financial lifeline, but it comes at a personal cost: the more he delves into the young model's complex world, the darker things get - and the closer he gets to terrible danger . . .

(Audiobook)

 I originally came across Cormoran Strike in the BBC adaptation of this novel. I liked the story very much and well, the book had to be better right? There was certainly more detail, more back story and interaction between characters. However, I'm left with a desire to re-watch the show to compare.

I understand the authors use of a new pen-name of Robert Galbraith - although thanks to the trolls of the internet everyone knows its J K Rowling - because this is such a departure from the style of Harry Potter. Also with the fame of that series, I think I too would use a different name so that the book was bought because it sounded like a good book and not just because it was by the same person who wrote that other series.

The story has a good pace to it, the narrator does a lovely job at both Cormoran and Robyn's voices, as well as breathing life into a whole host of characters as the story progresses. I will say however that the narrators voice was quite soothing when not doing Cormoran's harsh Cornish accent and I fell asleep at one point and had to re-find my place.

The book was dulled a little by the fact that I had seen the drama first and I could clearly remember from that who had done it and why but I would recommend it to someone who was unfamiliar with this book and its adaptation as a great first step into the crime genre.

I give it